Ncls Research

Employment and Income

See Pages 16 to 18 of your
Community Social Profile

Explore the employment status, income levels and occupations of your community, in your CSP. You can Share this with others, Engage this with reflective questions, Dig Deeper into background research and national trends or Apply this to your setting with worksheets and workshops. Choose an option to suit you.






Download your CSP and share
Churches can download a copy of their CSP, using their Admin Key on the NCLS website. The pdf file can be saved, emailed, uploaded, or a selection of pages can be printed from it.

Screen shots for power point and newsletters
Using a pdf version of your CSP, you can use the “Take a Snapshot” edit function in Adobe Acrobat Reader, to copy a section and paste it into a document or a power point presentation.

Questions to ask about your Community’s Employment (p.16 of CSP)
• What proportion of people in your local community is involved in the workforce?
• What does the level of part time workers signify about your community? What other activities do you think they might be engaged in (e.g. parents or grandparents who are employed part time and caring for children part time)?
• Is the age range of people who are unemployed in your community significant? What are the possible reasons for this?
• What might be some implications of this information for your church and its activities?

Questions to ask about your Community’s Occupation and Industry (p.17 of CSP)
• What are the most common occupations of people in your local community? Is your community centred around a few key industries, or is it characterised by diversity?
• Do you think the industries of your area give the community a particular ‘character’? How might this affect the life of your church?
• Are there certain occupational groups that your church may be in a good position to connect with? How might that happen?
• What relevance do these things have for the mission and ministry of your church?

Questions to ask  about your Community’s Income (p.18 of CSP)
• Would you classify your area as being a high, low or average income area? Does this surprise you at all?
• Have there been any changes to income patterns of your community in the last five years that stand out for you? If so, why do you think things have changed?
• How have these things shaped the life of your church? How might they shape it in the future?

Prepare a report on your CSP
You might like to use the questions above or Worksheet 5 in your Workbook to summarise key points, to share with others in your church or community.

About Employment, Occupation and Industry
The ABS asks people about how many hours they worked in the week prior to the Census. The population aged 15 years and over is then divided into those in the labour force and those not in the labour force. Those in the labour force are either employed or unemployed and actively looking for work. Those who are employed are further divided into full-time work (worked 35 hours or more), and part-time work (worked less than 35 hours). Those not in the labour force include everyone aged 15 and over not actively looking for paid employment. It includes full-time students, full-time home-makers and retirees.

View full list of Occupations
View full list of Industries

Things to look for
Both the ‘distinctiveness column’ and the ‘change column’ in the employment table give a strong indication of the nature of the community and the issues facing it. 

Have there been changes in the pattern of employment? Why do you think this is so? What does this suggest to you? Consider whether unemployed people in your local area are youth, young adults or older adults. What does this suggest about the needs in your area?

National trends
In 2011 some 61% of Australians aged 15 and over were in the labour force and 33% were not (6% not stated)*. The labour force was made up of 94% employed and 6% unemployed persons (95% and 5% in 2006)**.
Among the employed some 63% were in full-time work (above 35 hours), 30% were in part-time work (61% and 28% respectively in 2006) and the remainder were not stated or away from work***.

* Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), 2011 Census of Population and Housing, 2011, B42 Labour Force Status by age by sex (2 of 2), Basic Community Profile, Catalogue Number 2001.0
** Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), 2011 Census of Population and Housing, 2011, B42 Labour Force Status by age by sex (2 of 2), Basic Community Profile, Catalogue Number 2001.0 and NCLS Research, 2006, Community Social Profile Guide, ISBN 978-0-9804544-0-6
*** Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), 2011 Census of Population and Housing, 2011, B42 Labour Force Status by age by sex (2 of 2), Basic Community Profile, Catalogue Number 2001.0 and NCLS Research, 2006, Community Social Profile Guide, ISBN 978-0-9804544-0-6

About Income
The Community Social Profile presents information on the income of people aged 15 years and over. ‘Income’ here refers to gross income (i.e. all income sources before tax) per week. In addition to individual income, you will find family income. The Australian median family income is in the range of $1250-$1499 per week.

Things to look for
The graph in your Community Social Profile shows you the income levels of individuals in your local community. Are there any surprises? In Australia, on average, people are earning more in 2011 than in 2006. If people are earning less it may point to a higher number of retirees or unemployed than five years ago.

National trends
Median gross individual income has increased from $466 per week in 2006 to $577 per week ($30,004 p.a.) in 2011. Similarly, median gross family income has increased from $1171 per week in 2006* to $1481 per week ($77,012 p.a.) in 2011. In 2011, of those families earning an income, 12.6% had a gross weekly family income of under $600. Between 2006 and 2011 the proportion of families in Australia with a gross income of $2,000 per week or over ($104,000+ p.a.) increased from 20% to 37.1%.

* Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) Census QuickStats: Australia, Catalogue Number 2061.0

See the Community Social Profile Guide for more information, including Technical Notes and how to understand Tables, Maps and Graphs. [See p.18 of Guide]

Workshop processes to walk through your CSP
There are a variety of Workshop processes in your Workbook to plan effective ways to improve your connections to the wider community.

Worksheets for use

A selection of Worksheets are available in your Workbook to use alongside your CSP, to look at your community, chart connections and apply the information.


The CSP, Workbook and Guide can be accessed online by those churches who purchase their Community Connections Pack. Enter your Admin Key under "Administer Your Church". Your Admin Key was included on the cover letter in your Pack.


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